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Innotech Solar appoints former Suntech executive David Hogg to CEO role


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    3:00PM GMT+9

Innotech Solar (ITS) and CEO Thor-Christian Tuv have decided to part ways after identifying differing opinions on the company’s future growth and expansion. The company’s board is now focusing on creating a new long-term growth strategy to meet the dynamic challenges of the photovoltaic industry. The ITS board views the introduction of new skills and expertise as an important priority, and has appointed David Hogg to the role of CEO at Innotech Solar with immediate effect.

Thor-Christian Tuv has been with ITS since its foundation in autumn 2008 and has overseen rapid growth in the company. During this period, Innotech solar has strengthened its position as a world leader in the production of high-quality ‘green’ PV modules. During Tuv’s tenure, the establishment of competitive module pricing with leading Chinese solar companies was prioritized.

The new CEO, David Hogg, has over 25 years of global experience within the solar photovoltaic industry. He began his career as managing director of Australian Pacific Solar before taking up the position of CEO at German solar company CSG for 14 years. From 2010 until present David Hogg has held the position of COO at Suntech Power where he oversaw the initiation of operational and customer based improvements. He announced his intention to leave Suntech in December 2011, citing personal reasons for the departure.

Tellef Thorleifsson, chairman of Innotech Solar said, “On behalf of the Board of Directors, I take the opportunity to extend my gratitude to Thor-Christian Tuv for his valuable contribution to the establishment and building of ITS.”



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