Softbank plans 111MW PV plant in Tomakomai, Japan

  • The plant is expected to be operational by the end of March 2015. Image: US Navy Imagery.
    The plant is expected to be operational by the end of March 2015. Image: US Navy Imagery.

Japanese telecommunications company Softbank is continuing its investment in the solar industry and will develop an 111MW PV facility in Tomakomai, Hokkaido prefecture, Japan.

According to Bloomberg, 79MW of the large-scale project will be connected to Hokkaido Electric Power’s grids. The utility firm will purchase all electricity generated from the facility which is fed into its grids.

The news site also revealed that Softbank expects the plant to become operational by the end of March 2015.

Softbank began investing in solar when Japan’s feed-in tariff was introduced in July last year. Since then, it has invested in a 39.5MW facility in Tottori prefecture and in December the company launched a new programme which seeks to install PV arrays atop 1,000 residential rooftops in Japan. 

Japan’s solar industry has been booming since its feed-in tariff came into force last year and the market doesn’t appear to be slowing down despite the recent announcement of a 10% cut in the subsidies. Indeed, the Japanese PV market is forecast to grow by 120% in 2013 with the installation of more than 5GW of new capacity, according to an IMS Research report. 

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