• Print

Susan Greene named president of American Solar Energy Society

As Shaun McGrath, former executive director of the American Solar Energy Society (ASES), stepped down to pursue an opportunity in the public policy sector the organization announced that Susan Greene has accepted the position of president for ASES. Greene joins ASES after recently serving as senior vice president at The Cable Center.

“Susan Greene brings to ASES a strong track record in building growing enterprises, and especially in managing the critical interface of public policy, regulation and competitive business practice,” said ASES Board Chair Jeff Lyng. “As a media-savvy executive, she is the ideal person to guide ASES as it grows into a more powerfully effective voice for renewable energy.”

Greene has held executive leadership positions in several organizations including NBC, HBO, Citigroup, Time Warner Cable and was president of Women in Sustainable Energy. In her early career, Greene was an attorney at the Federal Communications Commission.

“I am delighted to join the ASES team,” Greene said. “The coming together of public policy, consumer interest and new and more cost-effective technologies in the renewable energy sector provides a unique opportunity for ASES to play a central role in the creation of the new energy landscape.”

PV-Tech Storage Promo

Newsletter

Preview Latest
Subscribe
We won't share your details - promise!

Publications

  • Photovoltaics International 26th Edition

    Looking back, 2014 was a year of convalescence for a PV industry still battered and bruised from a period of ferocious competition. End-market demand continued apace, with analysts towards the end of 2014 predicting the year would see between around 45 and 50GW of deployment. That has begun to feed through to the supplier end of the market, with all the main manufacturers announcing capacity expansions in 2015 and further ahead.

  • Manufacturing The Solar Future: The 2014 Production Annual

    Although the past few years have proved extremely testing for PV equipment manufacturers, falling module prices have driven solar end-market demand to previously unseen levels. That demand is now starting to be felt by manufacturers, to the extent that leading companies are starting to talk about serious capacity expansions later this year and into 2015. This means that the next 12 months will be a critical period if companies throughout the supply chain are to take full advantage of the PV industry’s next growth phase.

Partners

Acknowledgements

Solar Media