IMO offers off the shelf controller designed for axis PV systems

  •   Solar Cube calculates the ‘zenith angle’ and the ‘azimuth angle’, which together specify the exact position of the sun in the sky to withi
    Solar Cube calculates the ‘zenith angle’ and the ‘azimuth angle’, which together specify the exact position of the sun in the sky to within 0.010.

The IMO Solar Cube has been developed by IMO Precision Controls as an easy to set up solar tracking and measurement controller with the flexibility to adapt to either one or two axis PV module installations to track the sun’s movement.

Problem

Improving yield from ground-mounted PV systems has become increasingly important with lower FiT rates and power purchase agreements. Solar tracking can provide increased yield but it still has be competitive technology with fixed ground-mounted systems.

Solution

The sun’s position is calculated using local time and data comparing this with the longitude and latitude location of the solar array. Solar Cube calculates the ‘zenith angle’ and the ‘azimuth angle’, which together specify the exact position of the sun in the sky to within 0.010. To position the array the Solar Cube uses feedback from an electronic compass device connected via RS232 or RS485, which then activates the solar array’s actuators until the correct position is reached. The compass is mounted directly on the array frame to give accurate positioning information. 

Applications

One or two axis solar panel installations.

Platform

The Solar Cube can be configured to control up to four arrays from one controller providing additional savings. 

Availability

Currently available. 

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