Tariff Roof-Top Ground-Based BIPV Term
China
26 August 2013 mainly distributed = CNY0.42/kWh zone 1 = CNY0.9/kWh
zone 2 = CNY0.95/kWh
zone 3 = CNY1.0 /kWh
20 years in proposal
December 2013, under Golden Sun Program connected before 31 Dec. 2013 = 5CNY/W
connected before 60 June 2014 = 4CNY/W
The program stopped receiving new applications in March 2013
December 2013 listed in the first batch and connected before 31 May, 2013 = 5.5CNY/W
listed in the second batch and connected before 30 June, 2013 = 5.5CNY/W
over dued but connected before 31 Dec, 2013 = 5CNY/W
over dued but connected before 30 June, 2014 = 4CNY/W
Not Specified, for demonstration projects only
April 2012 transmission distrance < 50km = 0.01CNY/kW
transmission distance between 50-100 km (inclusive) = 0.02CNY/kW
transmission distance > 100km = 0.03CNY/kW
January 2012, under Golden Sun Program stand-alone systems in remote areas = 25CNY/W
residencial systems = 18CNY/W
connected before 30th June, 2013 = 7 CNY/W
BAPV, connected before 30th June, 2013 = 5.5CNY/W
the program stopped receiving new applications in March 2013

History

The BIPV subsidy program:

This was China’s first solar subsidy program. Announced in March 2009, this offered RMB20/watt ($3.24) for BIPV systems and RMB15/watt ($2.43) for rooftop systems.

The Golden Sun Program:

Launched on July 21, 2000, this programme was set up to facilitate the growth and expansion of the PV industry through fiscal subsidies, scientific and technological support and market incentives to accelerate the industrialization of PV technological and enable large-scale development of the PV industry. To qualify for the subsidy, each project must have a generating capacity of at least 300kW, construction must be completed in one year and operations have to last for at least 20 years. Total generating capacity in each province should not exceed 20MW.

1. The government will subsidize grid-connected projects and relevant power transmission and distribution installations by 50%.

2. Independent PV solar systems in remote regions will receive a subsidy of 70%/

3. Grid companies are required to buy all surplus electricity output from solar power projects that generate primarily for the developers’ own needs, at similar rates to benchmark on-grid tariffs set for coal-fired power generators.

Updates

Update Sep 01, 2013

Coverage of each zones for the FiT is listed below:

Zone 1 – CNY0.9/kWh

Ningxia, Qinghai Haixi, Gansu Jiayuguan, Wuwei, Zhangye, Jiuquan, Dunhuang, Jinchang, Xinjiang Hami, Tacheng, Altay, Karamay, Inner Mongolia region excluding Chifeng, Tongliao, Xing'anmeng and Hulunbeier.

Zone 2 – CNY0.95/kWh

Beijing, Tianjin, Heilongjiang, Jilin, Liaoning, Sichuan, Yunnan, Inner Mongolia Chifeng, Tongliao, Xing'anmeng, Hulunbeier, Hebei Chengde, Zhangjiakou,

Tangshan, Qinhuangdao, Datong, Shanxi, Xinzhou, Shanxi Yulin, Yan'an, Qinghai, Gansu, Xinjiang regions that not covered by Zone I

Zone 3 – CNY1.0/kWh- Regions that not covered by Zone 1 and 2.

Update Feb 01, 2013

EU member states have approved a European Commission proposal to register imports of Chinese panels ahead of its decision to impose tariffs on Chinese manufacturers.

Update Dec 01, 2012

Chinese government has approved a cash injection into its domestic market for 2013. Premier Wen Jiabao, has announced new PV and BIPV applications, under the Golden Sun programme to boost PV growth in the country and help local PV manufacturers.

Update Nov 01, 2012

The Chinese Ministry of Commerce (MOFCOM) has filed a complaint with the World Trade Organization (WTO) claiming European Union member states “illegally” subsidised PV manufacturers.

China has fired the latest salvo in the mounting international solar trade war by launching anti-dumping and anti-subsidy probes into solar-grade polysilicon imports from the EU.

Update Oct 01, 2012

MOFCOM seeks a Sino-American cooperartion to promote green energy and economic development for both countries. MOFCOM aims to rectify its previous trade war against the green energy wherea the US Department of Commerce’s (DoC) demonstrates a protectionist policy, which will not aid the growth of the PV industry.

Chinese manufacturers were asked to be held accountable for the “unmistakable causes of damage to the American solar industry” by the American solar manufacturers, distributors and installers, before the International Trade Commission.

Update Sep 01, 2012

The European Commissio (EC) and China’s Ministry of Commerce have signed a Memorandum of Understanding in Brussels to increase cooperation between the EC’s competition department and China’s antitrust authorities. The Memorandum covers legislation, enforcement and technical cooperation regarding cartels, other restrictive agreements and the abuse of dominant market positions.

Update Aug 01, 2012

The National Energy Administration (NEA) released the new renewable energy five-year plan for 2011 to 2015 for renewable energy to supply 11.4% of the total energy mix by 2015. Solar will provide 21GW.

The Coalition for American Solar Manufacturing (CASM) has issued a release stating that Chinese solar imports were down by 60% since June 2011, totalling US$99.6 million from US$241.5 million. Although the value of all global imports decreased in June 2012, compared to 201, imports from several countries rose significantly, compared with shipments in June 2011.

Update Mar 01, 2012

At $1.4699/watt for BIPV systems and $1.1429/watt for PV residential systems it is not surprising that China is in the top five for market leaders in 2011. Utility-scale tariffs remain at $1.1809. China had recently raised the target of solar energy to 15 GW by 2015 from 10 GW as solar energy has grown amazingly fast in the recent past.

Update Nov 01, 2011

The new solar FiT in China has been calculated to allow high single digit IRR. In a research note, Jeffries analysts said that due to the RMB appreciating and the impact of steep module pricing declines in recent months, the module pricing in China is now attractive at around US$1.20/w. With 1 rmb/kWh FiT and <$2/w installed system, project developers get high single digit IRRs.

Jeffries estimates that there are roughly 500-600MW projects approved by the local and central NDRC (such as Qinghai Huanghe Hydropower projects), which could qualify for the 1.15 rmb/kWh FiT. 

Jeffries forecasted that China solar demand would reach 2GW in 2012 and could become a 5GW+ annual market in subsequent years.

Update Mar 01, 2011

The National Development and Reform Commission in China has launched a new feed-in tariff (FiT) for both open and non-competitive PV project tenders that are above those previously accepted in the last bidding process. According to reports, electricity grid operators will pay solar developers RMB1.15 (US$0.18) per kilowatt-hour on projects approved before July 1, 2011 or be completed by the end of 2011. A price of at RMB1 per kilowatt-hour will be paid on projects approved after July 1.

Tariffs in the last bidding round were as low as RMB0.73 and only as high as RMB0.99 yuan per kilowatt-hour, suggesting China is relatively keen to not penalise PV projects that can offer significantly lower pricing than most other regions of the world.

According to Jeffries, the new solar FiT in China is calculated to allow high single digit IRR. In a research note, Jeffries analysts said that due to the RMB appreciating and the impact of steep module pricing declines in recent months, the module pricing in China is now attractive at around US$1.20/w. With 1RMB/kWh FiT and 
Jeffries estimates that there are roughly 500-600MW projects approved by the local and central NDRC (such as Qinghai Huanghe Hydropower projects), which could qualify for the RMB1.15/kWh FiT.

Jeffries forecasted that China solar demand would reach 2GW in 2012 and could become a 5GW+ annual market in subsequent years.

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