Yingli withdraws from MIP

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn
Share on reddit
Reddit
Share on email
Email
Yingli has withdrawn from the MIP. Source: Yingli.

Technically bankrupt manufacturer Yingli has withdrawn from the European minimum import price (MIP) agreement.

The company is one of the last major firms to pull out of the scheme as a result of global module average selling prices (ASPs) falling faster than the level of the MIP floor price.

Anti-dumping duties were extended for another 18 months in March this year. A review into how the MIP is calculated is also underway.

The price undertaking (UT) also included quotas on imports of Chinese cells and modules. Punitive tariffs are applied on products imported out with the UT.

“Since accepting the UT agreement in 2013, we have been committed to fair trade and robust market competition by participating in the price undertaking,” said Liansheng Miao, chairman and CEO of Yingli Green Energy.

“However, after carefully reviewing our EU operations and the current market situation, we have decided to withdraw from the UT agreement. We remain committed to our European customers and intend to continue to serve them with high-quality, reliable products through means that are feasible and available to us after the withdrawal from the UT agreement,” he added.

Yingli has a 300MW module assembly plant in Thailand.

Read Next

July 5, 2021
The European Commission has approved Lithuania’s recovery plan, which included a €242 million investment in renewable energy under the EU’s Recovery and Resilience Facility (RRF).
June 21, 2021
Canada has requested a dispute settlement panel regarding US safeguard tariffs on solar products from Canada after failing to resolve the issue through consultations
June 2, 2021
The first phase of GCL System Integration Technology's (GCL-SI) 60GW module factory in Hefei, in China’s Anhui Province, is on track to start production this September.
PV Tech Premium
May 21, 2021
Making room for solar installations is one of the industry's greatest challenges in Europe as countries seek to meet their net-zero targets. Edith Hancock explores the ways developers and trade associations are fitting new capacity where they can.
May 19, 2021
Swiss-headquartered module maker Meyer Burger has formally opened its first new manufacturing facility in Germany as the company scales up its heterojunction (HJ) cell and module capacity.
PV Tech Premium
May 19, 2021
In this exclusive video from Solar Media's Large Scale Solar Europe conference, we discuss solar PV's starring role in Europe's post-COVID 19 economic rival and the continent's plans to scale up deployment.

Subscribe to Newsletter

Upcoming Events

Upcoming Webinars
August 19, 2021
At 9am (PT) | 6pm (CEST)
Solar Media Events
August 25, 2021
Solar Media Events
October 6, 2021
Solar Media Events
October 19, 2021
BRISTOL, UK