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DNV and KEMA combine forces to create “world-leading” certification company

DNV has acquired 74.3% of KEMA's shares which it claims will create a world-leading consulting and certification company. DNV will becomes the majority shareholder with a 74.3% share, Alliander retains its holding (25.4%) as does Cogas (0.3%). The transaction is subject to the approval of the US, Dutch and German competition authorities.

DNV KEMA will consist of all 1,800 KEMA employees and 500 employees from DNV's renewable energy and sustainability activities. The new company will be led by Thijs Aarten, the CEO of KEMA and headquartered in Arnhem, the Netherlands. Aarten will report to a supervisory board chaired by DNV CEO Henrik O. Madsen.

"By joining forces, 2,300 experts will meet the needs of an industry in rapid transition and growth. The combination of cleaner fossil-fuel-based power generation and the increased use of renewables will truly make a global impact. This is the strategic rationale behind DNV's biggest investment ever," says Leif Arne Langøy, the chairman of DNV's board of directors.

Services will cover the entire energy value chain from energy source to end user, including wind energy, carbon capture and storage, carbon trading, energy efficiency, power generation, transmission and distribution and energy-related testing, inspection and certification.

The global energy sector is heading for significant changes and investments – the International Energy Agency estimates that US$10 trillion will be spent between 2010 and 2030. "Both KEMA and DNV have strong traditions as independent leading players with world class technical and business knowledge and growth ambitions," says Thijs Aarten, the CEO of KEMA.

"DNV KEMA's core markets are in Europe, North America and China and the new company will benefit our customers by providing them with a broader portfolio of services across the entire energy value chain," adds Aarten.


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