New York regulators adopt proposals to enable more solar development

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn
Share on reddit
Reddit
Share on email
Email
By speeding up, ensuring transparency and the cost-effectiveness of the interconnection process, proposals should enable more solar deployment in New York. Source: Flickr/ m01229

The New York Public Service Commission (PSC) has adopted new changes to state requirements to make it easier for consumers to go solar.

The PSC addressed state Standardised Interconnection Requirements (SIR) to add clarity and certainty to the interconnection process for renewable energy and distributed generation systems up to 5MW.

According to the Coalition for Community Solar Access (CASE) and the New York Solar Energy Industries Association (NYSEIA), the PSC’s decision will enable more solar development throughout New York, including community solar.

Specifically, the decision adds both efficiency and transparency in the process of submitting an application for interconnection to the grid by preventing any bottlenecks in the pipeline and providing more scrutiny of the cost. It requires applicants in the interconnection queue to demonstrate proof of property ownership within 30 days so that highly speculative projects are not taking up space in the queue.

Additionally, it requires developers to abide by certain decision-making and payment timelines to ensure that projects move along at a reasonable pace and that non-viable projects do not cause bottlenecks in the queue.

“We thank the Commission for its action to remove key hurdles to community solar development, and for creating a forum in which utilities and solar companies could work together effectively on solutions to advance clean energy development,” said Jeff Cramer, executive director of the Coalition for Community Solar Access (CCSA). “This marks one of the final puzzle pieces in making New York’s much-anticipated community solar market a reality.”

Hannah Masterjohn, CCSA board chair and VP of policy and regulatory affairs at community solar company Clean Energy Collective, added: “An efficient, transparent interconnection queue process and a fair way to share the costs of upgrading our electric system will be increasingly important to meeting the growing demand for community solar.

“We appreciate the collaboration of the New York utilities in this process and we look forward to working with our colleagues across the state to bring local clean power to more New Yorkers through community solar.”

Read Next

October 15, 2021
European renewables investment management firm Greencoat Capital has confirmed its entry to the US renewables market and is plotting to invest up to US$5 billion over the next five years.
October 12, 2021
US Department of Energy (DOE) secretary Jennifer Granholm has announced a new National Community Solar Partnership (NCSP) target to have community solar projects provide 26GW of power and create US$1 billion in bill savings by 2025.
October 5, 2021
The Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems ISE and M10 Industries have unveiled a new matrix shingle technology for connecting solar cells which is claimed to produce modules 2 – 6% more efficient than those using conventionally connected half-cut cells.
September 29, 2021
Island Green Power is to develop two solar PV projects totaling over 1GW on former coal power station sites in the UK.
September 28, 2021
Investment manager Quinbrook Infrastructure Partners has acquired a 350MW solar-plus-storage site expected to be the largest single site PV install in the UK once completed.
September 21, 2021
New York’s governor has proposed an expansion of the NY-Sun distributed solar incentive programme and revealed plans for two transmission projects that will transport renewable energy to New York City to help the state reach 70% renewable electricity by 2030.

Subscribe to Newsletter

Upcoming Events

Solar Media Events
October 19, 2021
BRISTOL, UK
Upcoming Webinars
November 10, 2021
8am (PST) | 5pm (CET)
Solar Media Events
December 1, 2021